Xtreamer Support System

All 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Word Description
802.11 802.11 is a set of standards carrying out wireless local area network (WLAN) computer communication in the 2.4, 3.6 and 5 GHz frequency bands.
802.11n IEEE 802.11n-2009 is an amendment to the IEEE 802.11-2007 wireless networking standard to improve network throughput over previous standards, such as 802.11b and 802.11g, with a significant increase in the maximum raw OSI physical layer (PHY) data rate from 54 Mbit/s to a maximum of 600 Mbit/s.
AAC Advanced Audio Coding (AAC) is a standardized, lossy compression and encoding scheme for digital audio. Designed to be the successor of the MP3 format, AAC generally achieves better sound quality than MP3 at similar bit rates.
AC3 Audio Coding-3 (AC-3) coding and compression technology was used by Dolby to create "Dolby Digital".
ASCII The American Standard Code for Information Interchange (acronym: ASCII; pronounced /ˈæski/, AS-kee) is a character-encoding scheme based on the ordering of the English alphabet. ASCII codes represent text in computers, communications equipment, and other devices that use text. Most modern character-encoding schemes, which support many more characters than did the original, are based on ASCII.
AVC A digital video compression format
AVI Known by its acronym AVI, is a multimedia container format introduced by Microsoft in November 1992 as part of its Video for Windows technology. AVI files can contain both audio and video data in a file container that allows synchronous audio-with-video playback. Like the DVD video format, AVI files support multiple streaming audio and video, although these features are seldom used. Most AVI files also use the file format extensions developed by the Matrox OpenDML group in February 1996. These files are supported by Microsoft, and are unofficially called "AVI 2.0".
AVR A voltage regulator is an electrical regulator designed to automatically maintain a constant voltage level. It may use an electromechanical mechanism, or passive or active electronic components. Depending on the design, it may be used to regulate one or more AC or DC voltages.
BIN A disk image is a single file or storage device containing the complete contents and structure representing a data storage medium or device, such as a hard drive, floppy disk, CD, or DVD, although an image of an optical disc may be referred to as an optical disc image. A disk image is usually created by creating a complete sector-by-sector copy of the source medium and thereby perfectly replicating the structure and contents of a storage device.
BMP The BMP file format, sometimes called bitmap or DIB file format (for device-independent bitmap), is an image file format used to store bitmap digital images, especially on Microsoft Windows and OS/2 operating systems.
CEC CEC allows up to ten AV devices to discover and communicate with one another over a HDMI connected system.
Composite Video Composite video is the format of an analog television (picture only) signal before it is combined with a sound signal and modulated onto an RF carrier. Composite video is often designated by the CVBS acronym, meaning "Color, Video, Blank and Sync".
DIVx DivX is a brand name of products created by DivX, Inc. (formerly DivXNetworks, Inc.), including the DivX Codec which has become popular due to its ability to compress lengthy video segments into small sizes while maintaining relatively high visual quality. The DivX codec uses lossy MPEG-4 Part 2 compression, where quality is balanced against file size for utility. It is one of several codecs commonly associated with "ripping", whereby audio and video multimedia are transferred to a hard disk and transcoded.
Dolby Digital Dolby Digital is the marketing name for a series of data/audio compression technologies developed by Dolby Laboratories.
DTS DTS (used to be known as Digital Theater Systems, Inc.), renamed as DTS, Inc. (NASDAQ: DTSI), is a multichannel digital surround sound format used for both commercial/theatrical and consumer grade applications. It is used for in-movie sound on film, DVD, CD, HD DVD and Blu-Ray. During the last few years of the Laserdisc format's existence, several releases had DTS soundtracks.
DVB Digital Video Broadcasting (DVB) is a suite of internationally accepted open standards for digital television.
DVI Digital Video Interactive (DVI) was the first multimedia desktop video standard for IBM-compatible personal computers. DVI technology allowed full-screen, full motion video, as well as stereo audio, still images, and graphics to be presented on a DOS-based desktop computer.
Ethernet Ethernet is a family of frame-based computer networking technologies for local area networks (LANs).
EXT2 The ext2 or second extended filesystem is a file system for the Linux kernel. It was initially designed by Rémy Card as a replacement for the extended file system (ext).
EXT3 The ext3 or third extended file system is a journaled file system that is commonly used by the Linux kernel. It is the default file system for many popular Linux distributions.
External drive An external drive is a type of hard disk drive or a USB storage device which is externally connected to a computer.
FLAC Free Lossless Audio Codec (FLAC) is a file format for lossless audio data compression. During compression, FLAC does not lose quality from the audio stream, as lossy compression formats such as MP3, AAC, and Vorbis do. Josh Coalson is the primary author of FLAC.
FLV Flash Video is a container file format used to deliver video over the Internet using Adobe Flash Player (initially produced by Macromedia) versions 6–10. Flash Video content may also be embedded within SWF files. There are two different video file formats defined by Adobe Systems and supported in Adobe Flash Player: FLV and F4V.
FTP File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is a standard network protocol used to exchange and manipulate files over an Internet Protocol computer network, such as the Internet. FTP is built on a client-server architecture and utilizes separate control and data connections between the client and server applications.
GIF GIF format supports up to 8 bits per pixel, allowing a single image to reference a palette of up to 256 distinct colors chosen from the 24-bit RGB color space. It also supports animations and allows a separate palette of 256 colors for each frame. The color limitation makes the GIF format unsuitable for reproducing color photographs and other images with continuous color, but it is well-suited for simpler images such as graphics or logos with solid areas of color.
GUI A graphical user interface (GUI) is a type of user interface which allows people to interact with electronic devices such as computers; hand-held devices such as MP3 Players, Portable Media Players or Gaming devices; household appliances and office equipment with images rather than text commands.
H.264 H.264/MPEG-4 AVC is a standard for video compression. The final drafting work on the first version of the standard was completed in May 2003. The intent of the H.264/AVC project was to create a standard capable of providing good video quality at substantially lower bit rates than previous standards (e.g. half or less the bit rate of MPEG-2, H.263, or MPEG-4 Part 2), without increasing the complexity of design so much that it would be impractical or excessively expensive to implement.
HD HD or High-definition refers to an increase in display or visual resolution.
HDD A hard disk drive (often shortened as hard disk, hard drive, or HDD) is a non-volatile storage device that stores digitally encoded data on rapidly rotating platters with magnetic surfaces.
HDMI HDMI (High-Definition Multimedia Interface) is a compact audio/video interface for transmitting uncompressed digital data. It represents a digital alternative to consumer analog standards, such as Radio Frequency (RF) coaxial cable, composite video, S-Video, SCART, component video, D-Terminal, and VGA.
IDX IDX is a subtitle file format for digital video.
IFO IFO is a DVD InFOrmation file that stores information about Chapters, Subtitles and Audio Tracks.
IMG A CD or DVD image file, essentially equivalent to an ISO file. On such a file, simply changing the extention from IMG to ISO can make it usable as the latter by most programs.
IP cam IP cameras are Closed-circuit television (CCTV) cameras that use Internet Protocol to transmit image data and control signals over a Fast Ethernet link. As such, IP cameras are also commonly referred to as network cameras. IP cameras are primarily used for surveillance in the same manner as analog closed-circuit television.
ISO An ISO image is an archive file (also known as a disk image) of an optical disc in a format defined by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO).
jDownloader jDownloader is an open source download manager, written in Java, which allows the download of files and split files from one-click hosting sites such as Rapidshare and Megaupload automatically. The user specified download links are split into packages to enable individual pausing and continuing of downloads. Split RAR-Archives are unpacked automatically after download.
JPEG JPEG is a commonly used method of compression for photographic images. The degree of compression can be adjusted, allowing a selectable tradeoff between storage size and image quality. JPEG typically achieves 10:1 compression with little perceptible loss in image quality.
LAN A local area network (LAN) is a computer network covering a small physical area, like a home, office, or small group of buildings, such as a school, or an airport. The defining characteristics of LANs, in contrast to wide-area networks (WANs), include their usually higher data-transfer rates, smaller geographic place, and lack of a need for leased telecommunication lines.
LOTR "Lord of the Rings". Fantasy classic.
LPCM Linear pulse code modulation (LPCM) is a method of encoding audio information digitally. The term also refers collectively to formats using this method of encoding. The term PCM, though strictly more general, is often used to describe data encoded as LPCM.
M4A M4A and M4P are the two main file extensions for native Apple audio formats used in iTunes and iPods . All Apple formats are part of the MPEG-4 multimedia standard which is based on Apple QuickTime . M4A are typically compressed, lossy files using AAC encoding, and of higher quality than MP3. M4P files are the same but are files specifically purchased through iTunes Store which employ DRM technology to restrict usage or copying. The M4A extension can also be used to denote the compressed, lossless Apple Lossless format. This is not a variant of AAC but is encoded in a similar way to FLAC.
Media Player A portable multimedia player (PMP), is a consumer electronics device that is capable of storing and playing digital media. Digital audio players (DAP) that can also display images and play videos are PMPs. Like DAPs, the data is typically stored on a hard drive, microdrive, or flash memory. Other types of electronic devices like cellphones are sometimes referred as PMPs because of their playback capabilities.
Mediaplayer A portable multimedia player (PMP), is a consumer electronics device that is capable of storing and playing digital media. Digital audio players (DAP) that can also display images and play videos are PMPs. Like DAPs, the data is typically stored on a hard drive, microdrive, or flash memory. Other types of electronic devices like cellphones are sometimes referred as PMPs because of their playback capabilities.
MKV The Matroska Multimedia Container is an open standard free container format, a file format that can hold an unlimited number of video, audio, picture or subtitle tracks inside a single file.[1] It is intended to serve as a universal format for storing common multimedia content, like movies or TV shows. Matroska is similar in conception to other containers like AVI, MP4 or ASF, but is entirely open in specification, with implementations consisting mostly of open source software. Matroska file types are .MKV for video (with subtitles and audio), .MKA for audio-only files and .MKS for subtitles only. The most common use of .MKV files is to store HD video files.
MOV The QuickTime (.mov) file format functions as a multimedia container file that contains one or more tracks, each of which stores a particular type of data: audio, video, effects, or text (e.g. for subtitles). Each track either contains a digitally-encoded media stream (using a specific codec) or a data reference to the media stream located in another file.
MPEG MPEG refers to a set of standards created by the Moving Picture Experts Group. MPEG refers to several video, audio and container formats.
MPEG1 MPEG-1 is a standard for lossy compression of video and audio. It is designed to compress VHS-quality raw digital video and CD audio down to 1.5 Mbit/s (26:1 and 6:1 compression ratios respectively) without excessive quality loss, making Video CDs, digital cable/satellite TV and digital audio broadcasting (DAB) possible.
MPEG2 MPEG-2 is a standard for "the generic coding of moving pictures and associated audio information". It describes a combination of lossy video compression and lossy audio data compression methods which permit storage and transmission of movies using currently available storage media and transmission bandwidth.
MPEG4 MPEG-4 absorbs many of the features of MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 and other related standards, adding new features such as (extended) VRML support for 3D rendering, object-oriented composite files (including audio, video and VRML objects), support for externally-specified Digital Rights Management and various types of interactivity. AAC (Advanced Audio Codec) was standardized as an adjunct to MPEG-2 (as Part 7) before MPEG-4 was issued.
NAS A Network Access Server (NAS) is a single point of access to a remote resource. The NAS is meant to act as a gateway to guard access to a protected resource. This can be anything from a telephone network, to printers, to the Internet. The client connects to the NAS. The NAS then connects to another resource asking whether the client's supplied credentials are valid. Based on that answer the NAS then allows or disallows access to the protected resource. The NAS contains no information about what clients can connect or what credentials are valid. All the NAS does is send the credentials the client supplied to a resource which does know how to process the credentials.
NTFS NTFS is the standard file system of Windows NT, including its later versions Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, Windows Vista, and Windows 7
OGG Ogg is a free, open standard container format maintained by the Xiph.Org Foundation. The creators of the Ogg format claim that it is unrestricted by software patents and is designed to provide for efficient streaming and manipulation of high quality digital multimedia.
Open source Open source is an approach to the design, development, and distribution of software, offering practical accessibility to a software's source code. Some consider open source as one of various possible design approaches, while others consider it a critical strategic element of their operations. Before open source became widely adopted, developers and producers used a variety of phrases to describe the concept; the term open source gained popularity with the rise of the Internet, which provided access to diverse production models, communication paths, and interactive communities.
PHP PHP, or PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor, is a widely used, general-purpose scripting language that was originally designed for web development, to produce dynamic web pages. It can be embedded into HTML and generally runs on a web server, which needs to be configured to process PHP code and create web page content from it. It can be deployed on most web servers and on almost every operating system and platform free of charge.
PNG Portable Network Graphics (PNG) is a bitmapped image format that employs lossless data compression. PNG was created to improve upon and replace GIF (Graphics Interchange Format) as an image-file format not requiring a patent license.
RA RealAudio is a proprietary audio format developed by RealNetworks. It uses a variety of audio codecs, ranging from low-bitrate formats that can be used over dialup modems, to high-fidelity formats for music. It can also be used as a streaming audio format, that is played at the same time as it is downloaded. In the past, many internet radio stations used RealAudio to stream their programming over the internet in real time. In recent years, however, the format has become less common and has given way to more popular audio formats. It is used heavily by the BBC websites.
RAID "RAID" is used as an umbrella term for computer data storage schemes that can divide and replicate data among multiple hard disk drives.
RCA An RCA is a type of electrical connector that is commonly used in the audio/video market. Decent enough quality, and you can find them almost in any TV. With this connection, you'll usually see a yellow cord for video, a red cord for the left audio, and a white cord for the white audio.
Realtek One of the world's leaders in designing specialized chipsets.
RM RealMedia is a multimedia container format created by RealNetworks. Its extension is ".rm". It is typically used in conjunction with RealVideo and RealAudio and is used for streaming content over the Internet.
RMA A Return Merchandise Authorization or Return Material Authorization (RMA) is a transaction whereby the recipient of a product arranges to return goods to the supplier to have the product repaired or replaced or in order to receive a refund or credit for another product from the same retailer or corporation. In practice, an RMA is only issued after a series of tests.
RSS RSS (most commonly translated as "Really Simple Syndication" but sometimes "Rich Site Summary") is a family of web feed formats used to publish frequently updated works—such as blog entries, news headlines, audio, and video—in a standardized format.
RTSP The Real Time Streaming Protocol (RTSP) is a network control protocol for use in entertainment and communications systems to control streaming media servers. The protocol is used to establish and control media sessions between end points. Clients of media servers issue VCR-like commands, such as play and pause, to facilitate real-time control of playback of media files from the server.
S/PDIF S/PDIF specifies a Data Link Layer protocol and choice of Physical Layer specifications for carrying digital audio signals between devices and stereo components over either optical or electrical cable. The name stands for Sony/Philips Digital Interconnect Format (more commonly known as Sony Philips Digital InterFace), the two companies being the primary designers of the S/PDIF format.
SMI SAMI (Synchronized Accessible Media Interchange) is a Microsoft accessibility initiative released in 1998. The structured markup language is designed to simplify creating captions for media playback on a PC, i.e. not for broadcast purposes.
SRT SubRip is a software program for Windows which "rips" (extracts) subtitles and their timings from video. SubRip can extract from live video, video files and DVDs, then record the extracted subtitles and timings as a text file, and can save the recognized subtitles as bitmaps for later subtraction (erasure) from the source video.
SSA SubStation Alpha (or Sub Station Alpha), abbreviated SSA, is a subtitle file format created by CS Low (also known as Kotus) that allows for more advanced subtitles than the conventional SRT and similar formats.
SUB MicroDVD is a subtitle file format for digital video.
torrent BitTorrent is a peer-to-peer file sharing protocol used for distributing large amounts of data. BitTorrent is one of the most common protocols for transferring large files, and it is estimated that it accounts for approximately 27-55% of all Internet traffic (depending on geographical location) as of February 2009.
TOSLINK TOSLINK or Optical Cable is a standardized optical fiber connection system. Its most common use is in consumer audio equipment (via a "digital optical" socket), where it carries a digital audio stream between components such as MiniDisc and CD players and DAT recorders.
Transport stream Transport stream (TS, TP, MPEG-TS, or M2T) is a communications protocol for audio, video, and data. It is a type of digital container format that encapsulates packetized elementary streams and other data.
UPnP Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) is a set of networking protocols promulgated by the UPnP Forum. The goals of UPnP are to allow devices to connect seamlessly and to simplify the implementation of networks in the home (data sharing, communications, and entertainment) and in corporate environments for simplified installation of computer components. U
VC-1 VC-1 is the informal name of the SMPTE 421M video codec standard initially developed by Microsoft.
VirtualDUB VirtualDub is a video capture and video processing utility for Microsoft Windows. It is designed to process linear video streams, including filtering and recompression, but lacks features common to dedicated video editing software.
VOB A VOB file (Video Object) is a container format in DVD-Video media. VOB can contain video, audio, subtitle and menu contents multiplexed together into a stream form. VOB is based on MPEG-2 Program stream format, but with additional limitations and specifications in the private streams.[
Vorbis Vorbis is a free software / open source project headed by the Xiph.Org Foundation (formerly Xiphophorus company). The project produces an audio format specification and software implementation (codec) for lossy audio compression. Vorbis is most commonly used in conjunction with the Ogg container format and it is therefore often referred to as Ogg Vorbis.
WAV WAV (or WAVE), short for Waveform audio format, also known as Audio for Windows[2], is a Microsoft and IBM audio file format standard for storing an audio bitstream on PCs. It is an application of the RIFF bitstream format method for storing data in “chunks”, and thus also close to the 8SVX and the AIFF format used on Amiga and Macintosh computers, respectively. It is the main format used on Windows systems for raw and typically uncompressed audio. The usual bitstream encoding is the Pulse Code Modulation (PCM) format.
WEP Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) is a deprecated algorithm to secure IEEE 802.11 wireless networks. Wireless networks broadcast messages using radio and are thus more susceptible to eavesdropping than wired networks.
WiFi Wi-Fi (pronounced /ˈwaɪfaɪ/) is a trademark of the Wi-Fi Alliance for certified products based on the IEEE 802.11 standards. This certification warrants interoperability between different wireless devices.
Windows Sharing In computing, a shared resource or network share is a device or piece of information on a computer that can be remotely accessed from another computer, typically via a local area network or an enterprise Intranet, as if it were a resource in the local machine. Examples are shared file access (also known as disk sharing and folder sharing), shared printer access (printer sharing), shared scanner access, etc. The shared resource is called a shared disk (also known as mounted disk), shared drive volume, shared folder, shared file, shared document, shared printer or shared scanner.
WMA Windows Media Audio (WMA) is an audio data compression technology developed by Microsoft. The name can be used to refer to its audio file format or its audio codecs. It is a proprietary technology that forms part of the Windows Media framework.
WMV Windows Media Video (WMV) is a compressed video file format for several proprietary codecs developed by Microsoft. The original codec, known as WMV, was originally designed for Internet streaming applications, as a competitor to RealVideo. The other codecs, such as WMV Screen and WMV Image, cater for specialized content. Through standardization from the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE), WMV has gained adoption for physical-delivery formats such as HD DVD and Blu-ray Disc.
WMV9 Windows Media Video (WMV) is a compressed video file format for several proprietary codecs developed by Microsoft.
WPA Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA and WPA2) is a certification program created by the Wi-Fi Alliance to indicate compliance with the security protocol created by the Wi-Fi Alliance to secure wireless computer networks. This protocol was created in response to several serious weaknesses researchers had found in the previous system, WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy).
WPA2 WPA2 replaced WPA; like WPA, WPA2 requires testing and certification by the Wi-Fi Alliance. WPA2 implements the mandatory elements of 802.11i.
XVID Xvid (formerly "XviD") is a video codec library following the MPEG-4 standard, specifically MPEG-4 Part 2 Advanced Simple Profile (ASP). It uses ASP features such as b-frames, global and quarter pixel motion compensation, lumi masking, trellis quantization, and H.263, MPEG and custom quantization matrices.