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Word Description
M4A M4A and M4P are the two main file extensions for native Apple audio formats used in iTunes and iPods . All Apple formats are part of the MPEG-4 multimedia standard which is based on Apple QuickTime . M4A are typically compressed, lossy files using AAC encoding, and of higher quality than MP3. M4P files are the same but are files specifically purchased through iTunes Store which employ DRM technology to restrict usage or copying. The M4A extension can also be used to denote the compressed, lossless Apple Lossless format. This is not a variant of AAC but is encoded in a similar way to FLAC.
Media Player A portable multimedia player (PMP), is a consumer electronics device that is capable of storing and playing digital media. Digital audio players (DAP) that can also display images and play videos are PMPs. Like DAPs, the data is typically stored on a hard drive, microdrive, or flash memory. Other types of electronic devices like cellphones are sometimes referred as PMPs because of their playback capabilities.
Mediaplayer A portable multimedia player (PMP), is a consumer electronics device that is capable of storing and playing digital media. Digital audio players (DAP) that can also display images and play videos are PMPs. Like DAPs, the data is typically stored on a hard drive, microdrive, or flash memory. Other types of electronic devices like cellphones are sometimes referred as PMPs because of their playback capabilities.
MKV The Matroska Multimedia Container is an open standard free container format, a file format that can hold an unlimited number of video, audio, picture or subtitle tracks inside a single file.[1] It is intended to serve as a universal format for storing common multimedia content, like movies or TV shows. Matroska is similar in conception to other containers like AVI, MP4 or ASF, but is entirely open in specification, with implementations consisting mostly of open source software. Matroska file types are .MKV for video (with subtitles and audio), .MKA for audio-only files and .MKS for subtitles only. The most common use of .MKV files is to store HD video files.
MOV The QuickTime (.mov) file format functions as a multimedia container file that contains one or more tracks, each of which stores a particular type of data: audio, video, effects, or text (e.g. for subtitles). Each track either contains a digitally-encoded media stream (using a specific codec) or a data reference to the media stream located in another file.
MPEG MPEG refers to a set of standards created by the Moving Picture Experts Group. MPEG refers to several video, audio and container formats.
MPEG1 MPEG-1 is a standard for lossy compression of video and audio. It is designed to compress VHS-quality raw digital video and CD audio down to 1.5 Mbit/s (26:1 and 6:1 compression ratios respectively) without excessive quality loss, making Video CDs, digital cable/satellite TV and digital audio broadcasting (DAB) possible.
MPEG2 MPEG-2 is a standard for "the generic coding of moving pictures and associated audio information". It describes a combination of lossy video compression and lossy audio data compression methods which permit storage and transmission of movies using currently available storage media and transmission bandwidth.
MPEG4 MPEG-4 absorbs many of the features of MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 and other related standards, adding new features such as (extended) VRML support for 3D rendering, object-oriented composite files (including audio, video and VRML objects), support for externally-specified Digital Rights Management and various types of interactivity. AAC (Advanced Audio Codec) was standardized as an adjunct to MPEG-2 (as Part 7) before MPEG-4 was issued.